The Reefs We Took

This sea of creatures has given me more than I could have asked for. My ancestors have taken it over and pried open the mysteries of the fish and corals that they had never figured out before in the early 2000s. Back then everyone lived above water until that world collapsed with continual industrialization. Only those of us who had eons of fortunes could afford our new lifestyles, which we took from the fish. At first we used machinery to keep alive in the depths of my friends the butterfly fish and angelfish. We engineered the reefs to grow larger and we made homes out of the calcium carbonate. The current inhabitants of the reef seem to bear little resemblance to the original organisms that our people crossed paths with. Of course, in our schools they taught us that the toxic organisms had to be removed so that we could seek refuge without losing our populations.

Here I learned the meaning of forming communities with organisms that are considered lesser than the humans. Our parents taught us about coexistence. So I get to swim around the warm waters while rays of sun penetrate our haven. It’s like the gods gave us this right to breathe in this sunshine and “rewarded” our families by framing our scenery with a second chance at life that we stole from our friends. I kept asking my parents where our food came from and they said that our tritons—leaders—made sure no members of our community were being harmed. I’m sure that outside the reefs it is open country and I believe that is where we get our produce. Lately more schools of fish have been traveling to deeper parts of the reefs where we don’t usually venture down to due to the enormous headaches we get as we descend. Our philosophers determine that we needn’t waste time descending when we should be prepared to ascend once again in the world when nature has run its course in our original lands. I can’t imagine how drab the dry world must be; we have so many colors and friends here. Apparently, in the dry world people can’t float unless they use machines.

My classmates are ripping pieces of sponge apart to see who can do it the fastest.

Advertisements

One thought on “The Reefs We Took

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s